NZEB + EV: The decarb combo

Are you aware of these stats?

  1. Buildings account for 40 % of energy consumption and 36 % of energy emissions (EU data)
  2. Road transport accounts for 25 % of energy consumption and 20 % of energy emissions (EU data and EU stats)

Then, what happens when we combine NZEB buildings (net Zero Energy Buildings) with local renewable generation and EVs (Electric Vehicles) charging in these NZEB?

NZEB & EV.png

It’s obvious… -> We can decarbonize 65 % of the energy system!* Sigue leyendo

Publication: Superconducting Fault Current Limiter

Recently we got published an article on short circuit current limiting on Elevier’s Electric Power Systems Research, were I’m a co-author;

Cover image Electric Power Systems Research

“Performance analysis of a Superconducting Fault Current Limiter in a power distribution substation”, Volume 136, July 2016, Pages 89–99

Antonio Colmenar-Santos, , J.M. Pecharromán-Lázaro, Carlos de Palacio Rodríguez, Eduardo Collado-Fernández

The results of the research and pilot project for this technology are promising. The short circuit current limiting with a superconducting system (SFCL-Superconducting Fault Current Limiter) is an example of FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission System) for the Smart Grid. It allows a real-time response, that is an automatic reaction, reducing short circuit currents, thus avoiding damage to equipment. This enables a more meshed operation while the energy losses are kept low.

The paper presents the operational benefits and performance of an installed system in a distribution network. These benefits are translated into economic terms, with the goal of setting a target price for economic feasibility of such systems. While the difference between the economic target of 100 k€ and the cost of the real project is tenfold, it remains a trigger for market adoption. Moreover, it is likely that economies of scale and technology improvements drive the implementation cost down in the coming years.

The consequence of widespread use of SFCL would be more reliable and resilient distribution networks. We will see more of this coming, in the near future.

The complete article is available for some days on the link: http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SbPa1M7~0UanK

Research article: Asessing Islanding Microgrids

The article we recently published, presents a method to assess the most appropriate microgrid configuration, depending on the costs of grid energy, renewable prices, storage, islanding conditions, etc:

Article Microgrids

Our definition of microgrid includes any network on household or building when including control, generation, storage or islanding capabilities. These microgrids must ask themselves what configuration is their best option, from full utility dependence to off-grid… The thing is: You ARE a microgrid, so what kind of microgrid is best for you to be?

Timer Plug off-grid TICTAC

Image from newkemall on freeimages.com

Actually, to turn every household and every residential, industrial or commercial building into a microgrid, with a Home – Building Energy Management system, with renewable generation (and storage) is the way of implementing the Smart Grid bottom-up and also Democratizing power generation.

It also pushes the system towards net-zero energy buildings which is the way forward pointed out by the EC, for example.

You also wonder what the Grid Independence Cycle is?

Read the article and take a look at Spain, where the menace for a toll on self-consumption and the fact that fixed costs are higher than variable costs may lead the system into the circle, with increasing partial or complete islanding (even with an additional toll, who knows) from the network.

Sea Energy Harvesting – off-shore

Of course, onshore resources are first.

Of course, it will take a long time before it’s real business, but we can start with the vision…

Where is the most “energy intense” location on earth in terms of wind, solar and other renewable sources? Is it onshore or off-shore?

Let’s see what sea energy harvesting is about…

Derived from Image by http://www.freeimages.com/profile/leonardobc

Concept derived from Image by http://www.freeimages.com/profile/leonardobc

There was in 2011 an interesting research I recommend here, that overlapped the irradiation and the temperature, in order to determine where solar can yield more, given the PV panels are less efficient the higher the temperature. The resulting optimal areas for generation where the Himalayas (not too accessible), the Antarctica (similar to off-shore) and regions in the southern Andes.

Sigue leyendo

Energycon 2014

Organized by: IEEE

Date & venue: 12-16 May, 2014, Cavtat- Dubrovnik – Hotel Croatia

The Energycon event was an opportunity to present a research paper on Smart Grid decision making part of my PhD. Very related to the topic I discussed in an old post: Smart Money for Smart Grids. It was included in the Distribution Grid Planning and Operation Session, part of the Track- Low Carbon Energy Systems.

The event, was also an opportunity to see other research on the subject, and enjoy the surroundings.

Cavtat adriatic view

A view from the hotel venue of the Adriatic

It’s impressive to see the number of presented papers on smart grid, for example Sigue leyendo

Movilidad eléctrica interurbana – Artículo

Recientemente publicaron un artículo parte de mi doctorado, algo que llevaba intentando desde hace tiempo y que aprovecho para explicar también en el blog.

El artículo completo está disponible en la red en open access.

El ejercicio de investigación que planteamos consistió en elaborar un método para planificar la infraestructura de movilidad eléctrica interurbana.

Source: sxc.hu, Axonite (www.pavelmatousek.cz)

Source: sxc.hu, Axonite (www.pavelmatousek.cz)

¿Qué quiere decir esto? Significa determinar cuantas “electrolineras”,

Sigue leyendo

YEEES Vienna PhD Day

Organized by: Student Chapter of the Austrian Association for Energy Economics

Date & venue: March 2013, Vienna, TU Wien

The aim of the event, as expressed in the call for papers, was to give PhD-students the opportunity to present their work in detail including a comprehensive feedback of senior researchers and professors in the field of energy economics.

For myself it was a very positive experience, for many reasons, I’d like to share my impression and recommend it to other fellow PhD students;

  • It is a great opportunity to present work in progress or a research paper and get very valuable feedback. The feedback is not only from professors, but also from peers, so you get inputs from researchers in the same field or using the same methodologies.
  • As other researchers present their work, you get ideas from methodologies or approaches and get additional contacts for the development of your work, as well as inputs from informal exchanges.
  • A seminar gets you away from daily work and research, where you might think new ideas for your work. You might also get interest in additional research and innovative topics.
  • As in my case, research is quite “lonesome”, getting together with fellow PhD students who share similar difficulties is motivational.
  • ..and of course it’ an opportunity to go out for dinner, some drinks and enjoy.

I’m more used to commercial congresses and conferences, so it was quite different, without the sales pressure and time stress to get business contacts and leads. If anything I missed was an additional entrepreneurial spin to orient research to business.

In short, it was a great and useful experience and highly recommended.