Research article: Asessing Islanding Microgrids

The article we recently published, presents a method to assess the most appropriate microgrid configuration, depending on the costs of grid energy, renewable prices, storage, islanding conditions, etc:

Article Microgrids

Our definition of microgrid includes any network on household or building when including control, generation, storage or islanding capabilities. These microgrids must ask themselves what configuration is their best option, from full utility dependence to off-grid… The thing is: You ARE a microgrid, so what kind of microgrid is best for you to be?

Timer Plug off-grid TICTAC

Image from newkemall on freeimages.com

Actually, to turn every household and every residential, industrial or commercial building into a microgrid, with a Home – Building Energy Management system, with renewable generation (and storage) is the way of implementing the Smart Grid bottom-up and also Democratizing power generation.

It also pushes the system towards net-zero energy buildings which is the way forward pointed out by the EC, for example.

You also wonder what the Grid Independence Cycle is?

Read the article and take a look at Spain, where the menace for a toll on self-consumption and the fact that fixed costs are higher than variable costs may lead the system into the circle, with increasing partial or complete islanding (even with an additional toll, who knows) from the network.

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Google energy storage

I’m surprised Google Energy has still not got it…

How did they create the most competitive data centres in the world to grow so fast? How could they build the most competitive energy storage centres in the world?*

If you know the answer to the first one, you probably know what I mean in the case of energy storage.

By Steve Jurvetson (http://flickr.com/photos/jurvetson/157722937/) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Google Production server. By Steve Jurvetson (http://flickr.com/photos/jurvetson/157722937/) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The key was and is to use inexpensive harware. With servers, rapid obsolescence meant they wouldn’t need to repair the PCs used for their servers, many of the servers wouldn’t ever work, and the design had to be optimized to work around these failures. Of course now they are interested in the most energy efficient server systems, as that is the main cost for operating data centres, but the cheap and fast concept remains.

In the case of battery storage, Sigue leyendo